North Superior Ski and Run Club

Race on Tuesday

CCHS has a race on Tuesday, January 17th at Mt. Itasca in Coleraine.

Equipment

This page will be used as a bulletin board for equipment that is available for sale within the CCHS Nordic Team.  When you are purchasing equipment remember that there are two main binding systems.  Currently, most team members are using NNN bindings.  It may be helpful to use that kind so it is easier to sell unneeded equipment to fellow teammates.

I would also recommend buying combi boots until you are old enough to invest in two complete sets of equipment.

If you would like to post equipment for sale on this page, e-mail marksummers@q.com

Technique

Learning to ski with proper technique is critical to becoming a good racer, and having the most fun possible while skiing. This checklist does not cover all aspects of proper skiing technique, just the most important ones. They are grouped in priority order: learn the skills in the “Priority A” groups before you worry about “Priority B” and so on.

Team Members: When skiing, proper technique should be in the forefront of your mind. It is especially good to practice technique while completing long, slow, distance workouts.

Coaches: While there are many other aspects of proper technique, stick to this list, and in this priority so the racers are receiving a common message.

Double Pole

Priority A:

1. Hips forward on pole plant

2. “Fall forward” onto poles; motion should be forward, not up

3. Start poling with stomach compression, then shoulder, elbow and wrist; don’t let arms collapse when poling starts

Priority B:

1. Legs fairly straight throughout, don’t lock knees

2. Upper body stays down until arms are finished

3. Aggressive forward arm return (not up)

Priority C:

1. Arms slightly bent on pole plant

2. Upper body bends to parallel to snow, maximum

Diagonal Stride

Priority A:

1. Returning foot weighted ahead of other foot (with ankle pushed ahead of knee as slope increases)

2. Hips stay high and forward, “lean forward from the ankle”

3. Ride your heel on the glide ski, knee should have a slight, comfortable flex for easy balance

4. Arm slightly bent as pole is planted

5. Kick early, explosively and with the whole foot

Priority B:

1. Weight on one ski at a time (ensure complete weight shift)

2. Complete arm and leg extension

3. Straight line through upper body and leg at end of push

4. Hips rotate slightly (without twisting upper body), in order to push returning foot forward

Priority C:

1. Shoulder reaches forward on pole plant with low hands

2. Pole plant opposite foot, further back as slope increases

3. Release pole, extend wrist at finish of poling motion

4. Arm recovers in a straight, forward plane

Skating

General Notes:

1. Weight must be shifted from ski to ski “Skiing is a one ski at a time sport (classic and skating)”

2. Snappy, full extensions of arms and legs

3. Minimize the size of the V whenever possible

4. Upper body stays generally oriented down the track

5. Good forward body lean is critical; “bend forward from the ankle”. Do not bend at the waist!

Lower Body:

1. Leg push is to the side, not back, with heel kept down

2. Gliding ski is flat

3. Push from a flexed knee and ankle

4. Ski is parallel to snow at push off

Upper Body:

1. Plant poles close to skis

2. Reach ahead with slightly bent arms (including shoulders)

3. Shoulders parallel to the ground

4. Initiate pole push with trunk flexion followed by arm extension

5. Finish the poling with complete arm and then wrist extension, releasing the pole

V1:

1. Both poles plant as strong side ski hits the snow

2. Pole plant is offset: strong side vertical, weak side angled away with hand approximately at the middle of the chest (no more)

3. Center of gravity is constantly moving; it does not “linger” over glide ski as in V2 or Open Field

4. More flex in ankle, knee and hips than in V2 or Open Field

5. Maximum leg push on each side (no strong or weak side)

6. Quicker turnover when climbing hills

V2:

1. Pole plant is symmetric; both poles are nearly vertical at pole plant, yet angled back

2. Poling is done for every skate; it looks like what downhill skiers do to get in the lift line

3. Fall forward from ski to ski, landing with a flexed ankle and knee. This allows you to land in an aggressive, forward body position aligned over the gliding ski

4. Pole plant begins when the feet are at their closest (before the ski hits the snow); this initiates weight shift to other ski. Timing will be pole, skate; pole, skate; etc.

Open Field (V2 Alternate):

1. Pole plant is symmetric; both poles are nearly vertical at pole plant, yet angled back

2. Poling is done for every other skate (in other words every left skate or every right skate)

3. Fall forward from ski to ski, landing with a flexed ankle and knee. This allows you to land in an aggressive, forward body position aligned over the gliding ski

4. Pole plant begins when the feet are at their closest (before the ski hits the snow); this initiates weight shift to other ski. Timing will be pole, skate, skate; pole, skate, skate; etc.

5. Arm recovery starts with push of “other” skate, without pause

6. This skate is identical to V2, except you only pole for one side

Race & Training Schedule

Regular practice all week with waxing on Thursday; consult the race and training schedule for details.  Race on Friday; we will send out more info about the race as we get closer.

High School Ski Team

Welcome to the Cook County High School Nordic Ski Team’s Web Site.  The CCHS Nordic Team is based in Grand Marais, Minnesota and is funded and coordinated by the North Superior Ski and Run Club (NSSRC).  The team is made possible by the support of many volunteers, local supporters, local businesses, parents, and of course, the athletes themselves.  The team’s goal is to develop the technical skills and physical conditioning to ski faster, but most importantly, we want to have fun enjoying winter on skis.  The goal of this website is to allow Nordic skiing enthusiasts, supporters, fans, parents, and the athletes to stay up to date on current team news, race results, and training info.  Bring on the snow.